more parenting horrors

Since I’ve brought up the subject of clueless parenting, let me add some personal experience that re-enforces my belief in a National Parent Fitness Exam, of which the media can create some cutesy acronym like NAPARFEX  or The Dumbass Test.

Last night was the final home game for the Trenton Thunder, the local Yankee AA farm team.  The Mrs. and I bought a six-pack of tickets and this was game six of our package.  The seats were excellent, three rows back from the field in the first base line. I’m not boasting — it’s important to the story.  Well, maybe I am boasting a little.  Anyway…

Last night must have also been Bring Your Child Under Three Years Old Night.  The place was crawling with toddlers.  As we made our way to our seats we noticed a little tow-headed blond guy sitting in one of our seats.  This is not a big deal as the games are rarely sold out and there are always seats around one’s ticketed seats, so we sat in some empty chairs behind the kid and his Mom.

Well, the little kid turned out to be possessed and Mom was one of these in the ozone yuppie Moms who thinks having a rational, calm conversation with a ranting, screaming three-year-old about his feelings is the proper way to go.  Let me give you the highlights.

– The kid had a baseball – a hardball – and kept tossing it in the air and letting it hit the concrete floor.  Amazingly it didn’t land on anybody’s head.  After about half a dozen tosses, Mommy Dearest decides to pick up the ball and hold it.  Little Damian has a fit.  I mean a FIT where he’s landing punches on his mother.  Mom….does not react.  At all.  After about 10 minutes she takes little Farquhar for a walk.  She comes back holding him while he’s munching on a bag of chips.

– The kid discovers the stadium chairs are spring-loaded so the seat part folds up when you stand up.  Now I understand the attraction of a three-year-old to spring action things.  Junior, however, believes he his part of the chair manufacturer testing team and proceeds to stand on the seat, facing backward, and jump up and down slamming the seat into sitting position.  Repeatedly.  Mom…does not react until ten or twelve jumps have occurred at which time she pulls him into her lap and snuggles with him.  This act is repeated about half a dozen times throughout the game.

– The kid, late in the game, is left to wander up and down the rows of people who have left rather than commit homicide.  Keep in mind that we are sitting three rows from the field.  Junior discovers a discarded 48 ounce, hard plastic soda cup left behind, complete with lid and straw.  He pours out what little liquid is left in the cup, then proceeds to hurl the thing as hard as he can…towards the field.  Kid has a good arm.  It lands right next to a Trenton Thunder player in the on-deck circle waiting to hit.  Mom…was cleaning her glasses and missed the whole thing.  The person next to her – may have been her father or husband, just couldn’t tell – kind of sort of saw the glass fly out onto the field and thought maybe Beelzebub was responsible and nudged Mom.  Mom…looked sort of perplexed and made him sit down without a word.

At this point I went to the men’s room – trust me.  This was a good move on my part, for the safety of the other patrons.  I exited the bathroom and saw dad/hubby and clueless mom  dragging a screaming blond dirt bag out of the stadium.  Upon return, the Mrs. informed me that the kid was unsuccessfully performing gymnastic routines on the chairs and kept hitting his head on the concrete.
Me:  Any blood?
Mrs: no
Me: too bad.

The kicker?  Mom looked to be about 7 months pregnant.  So there will be one more psychopathic bully roaming the globe in the near future.

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19 Comments

Filed under common sense, dumbass, stupidity

19 responses to “more parenting horrors

  1. Sigh.

    As adopted parents, my husband and I had to prove that we had a safe environment for children, that there was a way for them to exit the area they would be sleeping in (windows), that the house had running water, flush toilets, and access to public education. My husband and I had to be evaluated by psychologists to make sure we were not violent offenders, potential child abusers, pedophiles. People who had known us for more than 10 years had to write letters saying that we would be good parents. Some people we knew who adopted from other countries had to sign a document promising not to kill the child and carve him/her up for organ donation.

    We resented (and still do) everything along this line that we had to do.

    But maybe there should be some requirements for parenthood. Beginning with a rule raising children that aren’t perpetual annoyances to the entire world.

    • It always astounds me when I hear about the amount of “stuff” people have to go through to adopt a child. It appears to me (and what the hell do I know) as if it is some form on punishment (“Ho ho – can’t create one on your own? Then we’re really going to put the screws to you.”) I can understand the resentments, especially when parents like the one in the post can freely procreate at will. Just doesn’t make any sense to me at all.

      • It was particularly horrible at the time when we would see frequent articles in the news about abandoned children, abused children, children killed by their parents or the boyfriend of the mother or something.

        Yes, it was very much having one’s nose rubbed in it.

        But I ended up with a terrific son, and am always happy we did things the way we did. And that his bedroom did, in fact, have windows …

      • I had a window in my bedroom growing up…with a steel reenforced screen that couldn’t open. hmmmmm. could explain a lot.

      • You can now be certain that you were not adopted secretly. Because fire laws require that adopted children can get out in case of a fire. The fact that my son would have plunged 20 feet into pointy shrubs didn’t seem to bother them a bit.

      • good thing you didn’t live in a high rise…

  2. scenes like that make me hear my grandmother’s voice. she worked in a women’s clothing shop for 40 years. when some mother came in with a hellion toddler my grandmother would ask them to get the darling to settle down. if mom threw up her hands and did nothing or said she didn’t know what to do she’d look them dead in the eye and say, “if you can’t keep a 3 yr old under some sort of control what are you going to do when they are teenagers?”

  3. *stunned*.
    Wow.. that is… well, horrible.

    I think I have mentioned a million times how my girl are really pretty good and behave well normally. We have run into a few situations though where I have had to do something other than the mom stare to get the reaction required.

    Once with the Bean, she decided while we were out at restaurant dinner with family that it would be a good time to start crying hysterically for everything and screaming for everyone. I’m not sure where this idea came from, but we were out of there pretty quickly (because she wouldn’t actually stop) and she was made to go into a time out in her room on her bed – no toys etc, for close to three hours. That is a helluva long time to a toddler. I didn’t have to spank her or anything, luckily she is the type of personality where removing her from a fun social event really drives your point home. Plus, she was around 31/2 – 4 and the no desert because we left the restaurant thing made her reconsider her actions as well. But she knew then that I wasn’t kidding around when I would ask/tell her to behave and what the consequences were. So we really haven’t run into that again with her. She knows I’m serious.

    The Boo on the other hand, we had a hard time with her and behaving in public. Not because of screaming or anything like that – but just because she is a fijit and can’t sit still. So we’ve had a lot of at home practice to be able to rein her in when around more exciting things lol… it’s been a pretty long road with that one – I must say! Lol… but she is really good now, and can focus on what is happening in her little spot (table, booth, seats, etc) and not be all over everyone else. So I count that as a total win.

    Sometimes I think people are a little to selfish, where they don’t want to miss out on something so they just appease the child so that they can elongate their time doing whatever it is they are doing. I know I caught flack for removing myself and Bean from the restaurant from a few people because it was a special event. How special is a toddler throwing a fit, and a mother not doing anything about it? How would that be better? It just isn’t, but it’s been lost on a lot of people.

  4. *stunned*.
    Wow.. that is… well, horrible.

    I think I have mentioned a million times how my girl are really pretty good and behave well normally. We have run into a few situations though where I have had to do something other than the mom stare to get the reaction required.

    Once with the Bean, she decided while we were out at restaurant dinner with family that it would be a good time to start crying hysterically for everything and screaming for everyone. I’m not sure where this idea came from, but we were out of there pretty quickly (because she wouldn’t actually stop) and she was made to go into a time out in her room on her bed – no toys etc, for close to three hours. That is a helluva long time to a toddler. I didn’t have to spank her or anything, luckily she is the type of personality where removing her from a fun social event really drives your point home. Plus, she was around 31/2 – 4 and the no desert because we left the restaurant thing made her reconsider her actions as well. But she knew then that I wasn’t kidding around when I would ask/tell her to behave and what the consequences were. So we really haven’t run into that again with her. She knows I’m serious.

    The Boo on the other hand, we had a hard time with her and behaving in public. Not because of screaming or anything like that – but just because she is a fijit and can’t sit still. So we’ve had a lot of at home practice to be able to rein her in when around more exciting things lol… it’s been a pretty long road with that one – I must say! Lol… but she is really good now, and can focus on what is happening in her little spot (table, booth, seats, etc) and not be all over everyone else. So I count that as a total win.

    Sometimes I think people are a little to selfish, where they don’t want to miss out on something so they just appease the child so that they can elongate their time doing whatever it is they are doing. I know I caught flack for removing myself and Bean from the restaurant from a few people because it was a special event. How special is a toddler throwing a fit, and a mother not doing anything about it? How would that be better? It just isn’t, but it’s been lost on a lot of people.

  5. Life’s about choices and consequences. If there are no consequences for bad behavior at age 3, then they will never learn to make good choices and as adults blame others for bad consequences. Sadly, in this country we are surrounded by examples.

  6. I hesitated to “like” this b/c I don’t like the behavior or condone the parenting – or lack thereof – but I enjoyed how well you summarized what many of see more often than not. *Sigh*

    This is one of my favorite clips on parenting:

    MJ

  7. Ugh! Sounds like the type of kid you want to pinch when nobody is looking.
    Honestly, I’d be lying if I said I never had to drag a badly behaving child out of a public place. You know, the walk of shame…head down, face red, death grip on squirming,screaming child. The stuff of nightmares! But it has to be done or the bad behavior will continue and one day that badly behaving child will be too big to drag anywhere.

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